Cornstalk at sunset, Danbury, Connecticut


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Current: Danbury, CT, United States
Welcome! A few years ago, I discovered an application that artists employ in their works to bring cultural awareness to their audiences. Having discerned this semiotic theory that applies to literature, music, art, film, and the media, I have devoted the blog, "Theory of Iconic Realism" to explore this theory. The link to the publisher of my book is below. If you or your university would like a copy of this book for your library or if you would like to review it for a scholarly journal, please contact the Edwin Mellen Press at the link listed below. Looking forward to hearing from you!

14 October, 2015

U.N. Agenda 21 and U.N. Agenda 2030: How will these U.N. policies affect YOUR community?

If you enjoy living an independent life in your own home, then please listen to the video below. Learn as much as you can about Agenda 21.

Agenda 21: How will it affect you?

Below is an extended explanation of Agenda 21 by John Anthony. It's over an hour in length, but very informative. Put the kettle on, pour yourself a cup of tea and enjoy!
Agenda 21 Explained

Below is the link to the 40 Chapter U.N. document, Agenda 21. Please learn as much as you can:

Recently, the United Nations decided to take Agenda 21 even further. The members of the U.N. signed onto Agenda 2030. A link to this endeavor is below:

Heart and Consciousness

In her book, Patriotic Sketches of Ireland, Sydney Owenson observes:
 Political philosophy is an extension of the mind’s eye to the whole great scale of civil society, and demonstrating the close-linked dependencies of its remotest parts, affords to the benevolence of the human heart, and the comprehension of the human understanding, a social system, gratifying to the feelings of the one, and ennobling to the faculties of the other. (33)

The human heart and 'comprehension of understanding,' which I will identify as consciousness, are two distinct entities, for the heart, aside from its organic characteristics, contains the essence of human emotions. On the other hand, comprehension of understanding involves the assimilation of intelligence and critical analysis as they interact with the psycho-physiological structure in a wondrous flow of human experience. I reflect on this concept in the following poem:

Flow I
Passion creates verve
whose song desires voice;
now boldly sing
radiate stillness
encircle fear: enflame!
This fervor flows
with molten resonance
angled benevolence
evolution through revolution,
illumined by the intricacy
of simplicity adorned
with interlacing

Jeanne I. Lakatos 

06 August, 2015

Mathematical Sets

Venn Diagram photo from Google Images

Mathematical Sets
It all figures:
balanced equations
sets of added digits
occasionally subtracted
divided by common factors
multiplied by these too
percentages based on 
the configuration 
of a situated O
and its relation
to the point.

Jeanne I. Lakatos

30 June, 2015

Cognitive Revolutions

We learn to recognize aspects of our lives that create impressions, unaware of the cognitive variations that our minds and bodies interpret and reinterpret. Yet, we continue to gracefully move through our personal universes. How often have we affected others? How often have others affected us?

Revolution of thought is inclusive of awarenss within the mind, the body and their inter/intra-connections. Very simply, as we perceive and cognitively organize our environment, we slowly create the opus that is only ours to share. To consider this concept in a positive way, that opus can move humanity to a higher consciousness.

Just think! If each person elevated his or her thinking to those matters that pertain only to the goodness and creative genius that dwells within, how generous we could be with each other! How marvelous this experience could be!

As we concentrate intently to our thoughts and their influences, we affect our reality, and thus, we open the possibilities of  individual connection with the Divine .

28 October, 2014

Sydney Owenson (Lady Morgan): Revolutionary

Sydney Owenson sheds light on the status of the common man and woman in mid-nineteenth century Ireland and incorporates semiotic structures within her works to communicate with her readers the various discrepancies in legislation, particularly the Act of Union 1801, decades after its enactment. Although inequity in governmental legislation exists internationally, by 1825, the imbalance within the legislative structures is unacceptable to intelligent women associated with the British or the Irish aristocracy along with the increasing numbers of female writers and readers.

For example, in the preface of her essay entitled, Absenteeism, she highlights the need for both the English and the Irish to be mindful of their patriotic responsibilities:

Notwithstanding the intense interest which is felt throughout all England concerning Ireland and Irish affairs, notwithstanding the frequent debates in parliament, and more frequent pamphlets and volumes published on points of Irish politics and oeconomy, the prevailing ignorance on these subjects still operates powerfully in maintaining prejudices the most unfounded and the most fatal, and in retarding those measures of wisdom and of justice without which Ireland can never be happy; or the British Empire secure. [1]

In this statement, Owenson demonstrates commonality between the authority, England, and the respective community of Ireland, as she begins with the phrase, ‘notwithstanding the intense interest which is felt…’ Thus, she engages in the use of negative phraseology linked with passive voice to unite the divergent intentions of England and Ireland.

[1] Sydney Owenson (Lady Morgan), Absenteeism, (London: Henry Colburn, 1825) pp. ix and x. For future reference within this study, the work will be cited as Abs.

09 April, 2014

Dante Alighieri's "Paradiso"

Photo from Google Images

Dante Alighieri’s Paradiso

This week, I’ve placed parallel posts on my blogs with both exploring Dante Alighieri’s final book of The Divine Comedy: Paradiso.

Spheres and circularity dominate the theme of this epic poem. Dante often even imitates the shape of the circle with his words. The Pilgrim and guide enter heaven at the convergence of four circles with three crosses. (This use of seven symbols refers to the seven virtues: 4 cardinal, 3 theological.)

The term "cardinal" comes from the Latin cardo or hinge; therefore, the cardinal virtues (Prudence, Justice, Temperance, and Fortitude) are pivotal to any life of virtue.In the Old Testament Book of Wisdom, 8:7, we learn that "She [Wisdom] teacheth temperance, and prudence, and justice, and fortitude, which are such things as men can have nothing more profitable in life."
In The Republic, Plato identified these virtues with societal classes and thus, the very  faculties of humanity:

Temperance: produces classes, the farmers and craftsmen, also animal appetites
Fortitude: associated with the warrior class and the spirited element in man
Prudence: associated with rulers and reason
Justice: stands outside the class system and divisions of man, and rules the proper relationship among them

The theological virtues of Faith, Hope, and Love (charity), indicate a higher level of consciousness and compassion. Lessons that pertain to each of these virtues repeat throughout the Old and New Testament and within more ancient religious precepts. 

09 May, 2012


This week's Poetry Jam has the concept of blindness as its theme. Below is a poem I've revised several times. I took the photograph whilst driving south of Dublin, lost and 'blind' to the correct pathway to I.A.D.T. in Dun Laoghaire. Thank you, gentlemen at Dunphey's Pub, for your fine directions and hand-drawn map!

A blinding
moves her
to close the blind
shielding her
from brilliance

the hour of dusk
with a creative verve
releasing gold

a beam expands
that cannot blind
for Memory
sustains the weakest eye.

Jeanne I. Lakatos